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Nurse burnout: When passion isn’t enough

A few months ago I was asked by the editor of Sigma Theta Tau’s online magazine, Reflections on Nursing Leadership, to write an article about nurse burnout. They published it as a part of their Nurses Week line up. In the article I share my personal struggle with nurse burnout and how I overcame it. I am very pleased to have my writing published in Reflection on Nursing Leadership.

Please take a few minutes to read and share with your nurse friends.  Chances are you have felt burned out in your career.  Share in comments how you renewed your passion for nursing.

 

 

 

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13 Fundamentals for Practicing Nursing

nurses

 

 

National Nurses Week is a time set aside for the public to recognize the amazing work of nurses.  Nurses will be the topic and focus of hospitals, newspapers and media outlets.  Our accomplishments, character and hard work will be applauded and we will receive all kinds of tokens of appreciation from employers, patients and family.

This year instead of another pen, coffee mug or tote bag, I want to give nurses something that that won’t end up in the summer yard sale.

 

Rosemarie Rizzo Parse’s 13 Fundamentals for Practicing Nursing

 

  • Know and use nursing frameworks and theories.

You can begin with Parse’s theory of Humanbecoming, which is an insightful nursing theory that describes how nurses and patients co-create the health experience.  Parse marries the art and science of nursing in a beautiful and applicable way.

 

  • Be available to others.

Nurses are busy.  Do not let the fast pace of healthcare prevent you from being available.  Remember to be available for the nurses around you. No one understands you quite like a fellow nurse. Take the time to listen, help and care for one another.

 

It is a poor coping mechanism to view patients as diseases, room numbers or annoyances.  Nursing is stressful, people are not always kind, and you may never hear a thank you, but it is important to value everyone as a human presence.

 

  • Respect differences in view.

Whether you are a new graduate or about to retire, you are a nurse with opinions.  Differences in opinions are good!  Respecting differences of view is important too.  Creating a safe and welcoming environment, for everyone to share their view, will allow nursing knowledge to evolve and grow.

 

  • Own what you believe and be accountable for your actions.

If you believe in something or someone, stand up and speak up.  If you turn out to be wrong, admit it and move on.

 

  • Move on to the new and untested.

Change is hard.  No one likes it, but change is necessary and good for us and nursing.  If we did not push forward and try new nursing interventions we would still be sterilizing our own needles and fetching coffee for physicians. Parse’s theory is a paradigm shift away from medical thinking that embraces nursing as a standalone science.

 

  • Connect with others.

Compassion, caring, respect, understanding are all qualities that nurses help nurses to connect with the healthcare team, including the patients.

 

  • Take pride in self.

You are not “just a nurse.” Being a nurse is exceptional.  Don’t shortchange your contributions to healthcare.  You are brilliant, own it!

 

  • Like what you do.

If you hate your job, find one where you can be happy.  There are endless opportunities in nursing.  You owe it to yourself and your patients to like coming to work every day.

 

  • Recognize the moments of joy in the struggles of living.

Life is hard.  Take time to recognize and feel joy when you find it.

 

  • Appreciate mystery and be open to new discoveries.

Nursing is a beautiful work. We are the companions to humanity throughout the life span and in every imaginable condition. We continue to discover what it means to be human day after day.  Be open to the mysteries of life and embrace what you find.

 

  • Be competent in your chosen area.

            What have you been doing since you graduated nursing school?  Have you been to a conference, read a journal, taken a class?  Choose your nursing niche and keep learning.

 

Taking time for self is vital in order to prevent compassion fatigue and nurse burnout.  Nurses are known for putting themselves last.  Their own health, spirituality, emotion and mental needs are often put aside in order to care for others.  Take care of yourself!  Take a few minutes to meditate, pray or sit quietly during a hectic shift and you will feel the difference, and so will your patients.

 

Thank you to all my nursing colleagues around the world!  This is the week that everyone remembers that nurses are a special kind of awesome. 

Let’s remember this about ourselves the other fifty-one weeks of the year!

 

 

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Bournes, D., & Mitchell, G. (2014). Humanbecoming. In Nursing Theorists and Their Work(8th ed., pp. 464-495). St. Louis: Elsevier Mosby.

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